Rachel Ann Hulvey

胡瑞雪


Rachel Ann Hulvey is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania and a graduate affiliate of the Center for the Study of Contemporary China.

Rachel Ann Hulvey is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania with research interests broadly spanning international order, international security, and Chinese foreign policy.

Her dissertation project, Mobilizing for Sovereignty, theorizes about changes in the ideology of international order due to the influence of a rising power. Even as material power accumulates, China uses socialization to mobilize support for new rules and institutions. As China seeks to establish new rules of the game supporting an alternative ideology, would some countries join the Beijing-led order and, if so, which? She develops a theory of hegemonic socialization explaining which countries gravitate toward China’s vision of world order.

Other related research agendas examine institutions within Internet governance. Cyberspace has seemed just beyond the reach of territorial governments due to the United States’ efforts to preserve a borderless and open Internet. What explains the diffusion of territorial control over the Internet? Other interests include examining the newfound authority of firms in the information age. How do technology giants like Facebook, Google, Huawei, and Baidu manage international relations and distribute benefits across borders?

She is a recipient of the American Political Science Foundation’s Dissertation Research Improvement Grant (2021-2023) and the Foreign Language Area Studies Award for Mandarin and East Asian study (2021-2022). Her research benefits from generous support from the University of Pennsylvania’s Christopher H. Browne Center for International Politics and the Center for the Study of Contemporary China. She is a Carr Center Technology and Human Rights Fellow (2019-2022).


Research


Research

Selected Working Papers

“Mobilizing for Sovereignty: How China Uses Socialization to Re-Write the Rules of the Game”

“Cyber Borders: Grasping National Territorial Control in Cyberspace” with Beth Simmons

“The New Global Governors: How Internet Giants Impact Distributional Consequences”

“Dragons and Doves: the Impact of China’s Leadership of UN Agencies” with Sabrina Arias

“Theorizing the Independence of International Organizations: IO-State Immunity Agreements” with Julia Gray

Policy Papers

Cybersecurity as an Engine for GrowthNew America

“中国的网络安全法” 青年汉学家文集 2018 (China’s Cybersecurity Law, China Academy of Social Sciences Young Sinologist Symposium, 2018)

Companies as Courts? Google’s Role Deciding Human Rights OutcomesCarr Center Discussion Paper Series.

Building Digital Walls and Making Speech and Internet Freedom (or Chinese Technology) Pay for ItIndian Journal of Law and Technology


Teaching Fellowships

War, Peace, and Strategy, Columbia University, Professor Richard Betts (2016)

Macroeconomics, Columbia University, Professor Thomas Groll (2017)

Chinese Politics, University of Pennsylvania, Professor Avery Goldstein (2019)

International Security, University of Pennsylvania, Professor Avery Goldstein (2020)

International Law, University of Pennsylvania, Professor Beth Simmons (2020)

American Foreign Policy, University of Pennsylvania, Professor Michael Horowitz (2021)


CV

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Contact


Address

University of Pennsylvania
Ronald O. Perlman Center for Political Science and Economics
133 S. 36th St, Philadelphia, PA, 19104

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